Broccoli traceability app delivers enhanced broccoli packing, broccoli inventory control, and recalls & audits.

Broccoli traceability packing brochures:  [Broccoli traceability packing]     [Farm management]      [RFID]

Broccoli traceability app.

Software app for Fresh produce blockchain traceability packing: grading, sorting, and processing. Includes export, wholesale, and full packing management app. Built around traceability & recalls: bar-code inventory, B2B Customer Portal, Shop front, FARM MANAGEMENT OPTION and more... Farmsoft provides complete management for onion packing, broccoli packing, citrus packing, pepper packing, tomato packing, avocado packing, potato packing. Salad packing, Loose leaf lettuce and other fresh produce such as spinach, rucola, chicory, watercress. Cucumber packing. Citrus packing app for lemon, orange, mandarin, tangerine, clementine. Asparagus packing. Onion inventory & storage. Potato inventory storage app. Potato traceability app for better packing & logistics. Onion traceability management. Tomato traceability for food safety. Print fresh produce blockchain QR codes.  Pepper & capsicum traceability app reduces pepper waste.  Broccoli traceability app for easy recalls and audits. 

Inventory traceability

Manage incoming Broccoli traceability inventory & storage inventory, capture supplier details, traceability and costs (optionally capture on PO in advance), create inventory & pallet labels, record storage location of inventory.  Automatic inventory audit trail and tracking.  Unlimited inventory items. Bar-code inventory management.

Stock-take traceability

Perform stock-takes any time by category or storage location.  Know how much onion inventory you have in real time, even search by storage location.  Report by product line and storage location, or product category. 

OPTION:
BROCCOLI FARM Management

Full farm record keeping, activity management, best practices, budgeting, time-sheets, machinery costs, inventory, cherry farm traceability, PHI/WHP management, and more... 

Sales, shipping,  order traceability

Print pick sheet to pick Pepper traceability inventory & storage orders manually, or scan inventory / pallets onto orders, or auto select inventory,  or rapidly sell without an order.  Track paid, and unpaid invoices.  Attach documents to invoices / photos of outgoing shipments.

Traceability & recalls

Instant mock recalls both up and down the supply chain using keys based on supplier lot/batch, supplier name, delivery date, invoice #, inventory #, pallet #, customer reference, order # and more...  Reduces fresh produce food safety compliance costs and makes audits easy.

Invoices, BOL, labels for pallets & inventory traceability

Choose from a gallery of invoices, bill of lading, freight notes, and industry standard fresh produce labels including Walmart, Tesco, Aldi, Coles, Pick 'n Save, Woolworths and more...

Batch packing traceability 

Record all batch inputs such as fruit & vegetables, packaging materials, and other raw materials.  Batch costs automatically tracked.  Batch recalls automatically track suppliers & traceability.

Logistics traceability

View open orders & balances. Assign orders to specific staff for picking, assign to trucks / driver, transport company.  Set loading order for multiple orders on one truck.  See when orders are ready shipped and print bill of lading, export documents, and invoices. 

Quality control

Perform QC tests for incoming pepper inventory, packed, pre-shipping. Configure QC tests for ANYTHING you want to test, supplier quality control tracking.  Attach unlimited photos & documents to QC tests from your cell or tablet.  

Price lists

Manage prices that will be used when a customer order is recorded.  Set up price lists for specials, specific products & customers or promotions.  

Dashboards

Profit:  Analyze profit of each onion line, variety, and even track individual customer profit, and batch level cost & profit.  Sales:  Monitor sales progress & shipments.  Quality:  supplier performance & more...

More...

Auto shipment and sale alerts to customers.  Configure BOM, packing / manufacturing processes, special rules to control the processes in your business (your consultant will do this for you).   

Value adding

For food service and processors:  specify the ingredients for each product you manufacture, farmsoft will calculate required quantities to fill open orders and schedule the batch.  Automatic creation of inventory outputs.  All ingredients and inputs are costed.

Unlimited sites & warehouses

Create multiple sites, specify which sites each employee can view (this restricts inventory, orders, invoices etc to selected sites).  Great for businesses with multiple locations across the country or planet.

Global traceability standards

Farmsoft supports global traceability standards such as GS1 Global Traceability Standard,  

Purchase orders

Order raw materials, packaging materials and more from suppliers.  Analyze orders and prices using Purchases dashboard. 

Re-order alerts

Receive alerts when inventory needs to be reordered, analyze inventory that will need ordering in the future, and inventory that is approaching expiry...


Finance apps

Integrate with Xero finance, or export invoices (AR) and Purchase Orders (AP) to your chosen finance app like MYOB, Quickbooks, , FreshBooks, Wave, SaasAnt, SAGE and others...

Reduce Broccoli   waste by 99%

Inventory control ensures there is no 'shrinkage', fresh produce inventory is FIFO managed, and expiring inventory always monitored, with automatic traceability being enforced at all times.

Reduce Broccoli traceability administration time by 60%

Automatic traceability & paperwork, labels (case and pallet) and reporting reduces the burden on administration teams and saves everyone's time.

Rapid & consistent Broccoli quality control

Quality control and food safety has never been easier with industry standard quality tests, food safety checklists; or configure your own tests.  Enhanced post harvest traceability.

100% accurate Broccoli orders, 100% accurate traceability!

Guarantee only the correct inventory is shipped for each order, on time, every time.  Simple traceability solution.

Easy Broccoli traceability

Perform instant mock recalls and audits at any time, from anywhere. No need to compile reports or search for documents. International food safety traceability standards maintained.

Reduce Broccoli traceability overheads by 40%

Automated management of traceability tasks saves operational teams time recording traceability information. 

Faster Broccoli inventory & traceability

Know exactly which inventory is available, where it is, and when it expires:  any-time, anywhere.  Bar-code tracked inventory is fast and accurate.

100% accurate Broccoli production & packing

Rapidly assign customer orders to production batches, line & inventory managers receive instant alerts.  Manufacture / pack the exact quantity required for each order. 

Broccoli packing & processing inventory control sales traceability
Broccoli packing & processing, inventory QC traceability by farmsoft reduces waste and increases productivity in broccoli packing businesses.
Farmsoft delivers reduced waste in the broccoli packing traceability & quality control, processing, storage, distribution phases. By enforcing best practices, FIFO, inventory expiry monitoring, and easy stock takes to minimize waste and maximize packing profit. Use bar-code managed inventory, labeling, 3D pallet storage, to help reduce waste.

BROCCOLI PACKING
Conduct recalls in seconds, with full confidence of accuracy and reliability. Minimize risk by ensuring accurate traceability is automatically captured. Pass audits with ease & reduce compliance costs using farmsoft's traceability guidelines. Trace fresh produce up and down the supply chain, over multiple traceability hops. Instantly produce farm records and any other farm traceability records if you optionally use our farm solution.

REDUCE ADMINISTRATION COSTS FOR BROCCOLI PACKING
Minimize your administration costs with automatic paperwork generation. Ensure accuracy of paperwork by having necessary documentation (invoice formats, export documents, transport documents etc) automatically generated based on the needs of the specific customer - ensuring timely and accurate documentation. No more rejected orders because of bad documentation accompanying a shipment. Food traceability software made easy!

CONSISTENT QUALITY CONTROL FOR BROCCOLI PACKING
Guarantee consistent, accurate, and efficient quality control is performed at any part of the fresh produce handling life-cycle; including during delivery, pre processing, post processing, and dispatch. Create quality control tests based on each customers requirements, and even create a daily factory hygiene test, employee performance tests and more. Accurate quality control helps to improve customer confidence and quality perception. Easily follow fresh produce quality control & fresh produce inventory guidelines.

BETTER PRODUCTION PLANNING & DISPATCH FOR BROCCOLI PACKING
Monitor orders, assign orders to specific pack-houses (you can have unlimited processing sites in farmsoft), and allow micro monitoring of each production lines output requirements using dashboards. The dashboards ensure the correct products are produced at the correct time to fill orders. Dispatch teams are given details on their mobile device (or PC/Mac) and scan pallets onto orders. Administration teams can see orders are picked and ready for dispatch, and are presented with the correct documents for printing. All of these features result in improved accuracy of both production and dispatch processes.

OPTIONAL FARM SOFTWARE INTEGRATION FOR FARM TO PLATE MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS
Optionally use farmsoft Farm Management software with our Post Harvest solution. Using both solutions provides an end to end solution from field to plate. Farm Management by farmsoft delivers full farm record keeping, farm inventory, cost monitoring, budgeting, best practice enforcement, and adherence to international farming standards. Use Farm Management by farmsoft to manage your own farms, or even hundreds of external farms that supply your fresh produce company.     Broccoli packing & processing, food service business management software for improved food safety & reduced waste. Broccoli packing & processing, inventory QC traceability by farmsoft reduces waste and increases productivity in broccoli packing businesses.

Tracing Broccoli: The Journey from Seed to Table
This green plant is a window into better understanding food production and distribution at the Hudson Valley Farm Hub.

In the spring of 2019, the Hudson Valley Farm Hub began following several trays of broccoli on camera as a window into the process of growing vegetables — from production to distribution. 

While production is a process that can be broken down into predictable parts, there remain the constant wildcards of Mother Nature and shifts in weather. And so it was with broccoli.

Out of the 20 different vegetables planted on 30 acres in 2019, broccoli occupied a total of 7.5 acres. Compared to other vegetables at the farm, it had a relatively lengthy growing season; from March through November. The five varieties of broccoli were all planted using a “high density” technique — a first for the Farm Hub. As Jeff Arnold, vegetable production manager, explains, this method produces smaller heads than in a traditional system, but because there are more plants per acre, the overall yield tends to be higher. The decision to grow high-density broccoli was partly to combat hollow stem, a defect that can be caused by nutrient imbalances and environmental factors. The result leaves a visibly empty tunnel in the flowers’ stem. Depending on the cause, tighter plant spacing can remedy the defect. The Farm Hub had wrestled with hollow stem for several growing seasons and finally saw a dramatic reduction in 2019. 

But the past growing season was not immune to curveballs. Broccoli’s early success (the plants that were seeded in early spring and harvested in early summer) was overshadowed by later plantings that were affected by Black Rot and Downy Mildew — two pathogens that can be devastating in biological systems. These bacterial and fungal diseases, common enemies of the brassica family, emerged in July. The pathogens can be spread by weed seeds, wind, and splashing rain, and this year, some of the broccoli at the Farm Hub was hit particularly hard due to the high-density planting. Organic control options for these diseases are limited and largely ineffective. Plants are infected early in life and if environmental conditions favor the disease, the heads that develop can become deformed and unmarketable.

Broccoli being harvested at the Hudson Valley Farm Hub in 2019.
Courtesy of Hudson Valley Farm Hub

In addition to disease avoidance, the right temperature is critical to a successful harvest. Broccoli is especially unpredictable when it comes to temperature. It prefers a window of 50 to 70 degrees and thrives in regions with cooler climates. 

“Broccoli is a cool-season crop that is sensitive to temperatures both too high and too low. Lower temperatures can result in `buttoning up,’ or small premature heads, while higher temperatures can result in uneven bud formation and poor flavor,” says Arnold.

On a positive note, the harvests in early summer were robust, and boxes of perfect broccoli from that part of the season were transported from the wash and pack facility at the farm to food pantries and soup kitchens in Ulster County. 

The trays of broccoli that we followed on camera were harvested, moved to the wash and pack, and picked up by folks from the CCE-Orange County’s  Gleaning/Food Access program that distributes produce to the Hudson Valley Food Bank and to local food pantries, soup kitchens, and community organizations. Soon after, the broccoli was trucked to The Putnam Valley Community Food Pantry and distributed to over 40 families. 

Countless factors can determine the success and failure of a crop. Ultimately, the season ended on a positive note with a mostly healthy crop of broccoli. The broccoli was processed for donation and also sold at the Kingston YMCA winter market. The field was mowed and disked in on Veterans Day to make room for a blanket of cover crops. 

The Farm Hub will continue to grow broccoli. Last year’s growing season remains an important learning lesson as growers and researchers seek to find ways to manage disease. This spring, the Farm Hub will host a trial by Cornell University researchers which will test the effectiveness of a range of bio-rational pest controls in broccoli production (see separate story on research trials). 

A field of broccoli at dawn. Courtesy of Hudson Valley Farm Hub

Even if there is hollow stem, Arnold says the broccoli is sellable and edible since the problem is cosmetic and it can be sold as crowns or as florets.

“We are going into it knowing that there may be some hollow stem, but the reduction in disease will be well worth it,” says Arnold. 

Soon the sounds of the whir and grind of the seeder will fill the greenhouse, the seeds will find a temporary home where they are watered and soak in the light that filters through the opaque greenhouse. In a few weeks the wagons will be packed with a matrix of trays where the tiny plants will acclimate to the natural elements before being planted out in the field. A new cycle begins again.

Broccoli Safety & Traceability
Through the analysis and elaboration on the research status, system design and main structure of the domestic and foreign traceability system, given that we failed to retrieve the related research of broccoli safety production early-warning and quality traceability systems in domestic till now, we establish the broccoli safety production early warning, control as well as the quality traceability management systems on the basis of previous organic vegetables quality traceability system by using the barcode/QR code and computer component technology. It fully embodies the public security concept that the safe agricultural products are produced and unsafe products are detected. This system has good extensibility in many fields, a variety of security labels and so on.

Broccoli crown traceability
While production is a process that can be broken down into predictable parts, there remain the constant wildcards of Mother Nature and shifts in weather. And so it was with broccoli.

Out of the 20 different vegetables planted on 30 acres in 2019, broccoli occupied a total of 7.5 acres. Compared to other vegetables at the farm, it had a relatively lengthy growing season; from March through November. The five varieties of broccoli were all planted using a “high density” technique—a first for the Farm Hub. As Jeff Arnold, vegetable production manager, explains, this method produces smaller heads than in a traditional system, but because there are more plants per acre, the overall yield tends to be higher. The decision to grow high-density broccoli was partly to combat hollow stem, a defect that can be caused by nutrient imbalances and environmental factors. The result leaves a visibly empty tunnel in the flowers’ stem. Depending on the cause, tighter plant spacing can remedy the defect. The Farm Hub had wrestled with hollow stem for several growing seasons and finally saw a dramatic reduction in 2019.


Jeff Arnold, the vegetable production manager, examines a broccoli crown.
But the past growing season was not immune to curveballs. Broccoli’s early success (the plants that were seeded in early spring and harvested in early summer) was overshadowed by later plantings that were affected by Black Rot and Downy Mildew—two pathogens that can be devastating in biological systems. These bacterial and fungal diseases, common enemies of the brassica family, emerged in July. The pathogens can be spread by weed seeds, wind, and splashing rain, and this year, some of the broccoli at the Farm Hub was hit particularly hard due to the high-density planting. Organic control options for these diseases are limited and largely ineffective. Plants are infected early in life and if environmental conditions favor the disease, the heads that develop can become deformed and unmarketable.


Production staff harvest broccoli last summer.
In addition to disease avoidance, the right temperature is critical to a successful harvest. Broccoli is especially unpredictable when it comes to temperature. It prefers a window of 50 to 70 degrees and thrives in regions with cooler climates.

“Broccoli is a cool-season crop that is sensitive to temperatures both too high and too low. Lower temperatures can result in `buttoning up,’ or small premature heads, while higher temperatures can result in uneven bud formation and poor flavor,” says Arnold.

On a positive note, the harvests in early summer were robust, and boxes of perfect broccoli from that part of the season were transported from the wash and pack facility at the farm to food pantries and soup kitchens in Ulster County.


Stiles Najac, from Cornell Cooperative Extension Orange County’s gleaning program, picks up broccoli for donation.
The trays of broccoli that we followed on camera were harvested, moved to the wash and pack, and picked up by folks from the CCE-Orange County’s Gleaning/Food Access program that distributes produce to the Hudson Valley Food Bank and to local food pantries, soup kitchens, and community organizations. Soon after, the broccoli was trucked to The Putnam Valley Community Food Pantry and distributed to over 40 families.

A new vantage

Countless factors can determine the success and failure of a crop. Ultimately, the season ended on a positive note with a mostly healthy crop of broccoli. The broccoli was processed for donation and also sold at the Kingston YMCA winter market. The field was mowed and disked in on Veterans Day to make room for a blanket of cover crops.


Broccoli will again be seeded this spring.
The Farm Hub will continue to grow broccoli. Last year’s growing season remains an important learning lesson as growers and researchers seek to find ways to manage disease. This spring, the Farm Hub will host a trial by Cornell researchers which will test the effectiveness of a range of bio-rational pest controls in broccoli production (see separate story on research trials).

Even if there is hollow stem, Arnold says the broccoli is sellable and edible since the problem is cosmetic and it can be sold as crowns or as florets.

“We are going into it knowing that there may be some hollow stem, but the reduction in disease will be well worth it,” says Arnold.

Soon the sounds of the whir and grind of the seeder will fill the greenhouse, the seeds will find a temporary home where they are watered and soak in the light that filters through the opaque greenhouse. In a few weeks the wagons will be packed with a matrix of trays where the tiny plants will acclimate to the natural elements before being planted out in the field. A new cycle begins again