Leafy greens traceability app: business management packing & processing of kale, microgreens, collard greens, spinach, cabbage, beet, watercress, romaine lettuce, swiss chard, arugula, rukola, endive, bok choy, turnip greens.

Leafy greens traceability packing brochures:  [Leafy greens traceability packing]     [Farm management]      [RFID]

Leafy greens traceability app.

Software app for Fresh produce Leafy greens packing: grading, sorting, and processing. Includes export, wholesale, and full packing management app. Built around traceability & recalls: bar-code inventory, B2B Customer Portal, Shop front, FARM MANAGEMENT OPTION and more... Farmsoft provides complete management for onion packing, broccoli packing, citrus packing, pepper packing, tomato packing, avocado packing, potato packing. Salad packing, Loose leaf lettuce and other fresh produce such as spinach, rucola, chicory, watercress. Cucumber packing. Citrus packing app for lemon, orange, mandarin, tangerine, clementine. Asparagus packing. Onion inventory & storage. Potato inventory storage app. Potato traceability app for better packing & logistics. Onion traceability management. Tomato traceability for food safety. Print fresh produce blockchain QR codes.  Pepper & capsicum traceability app reduces pepper waste.  Broccoli traceability app for easy recalls and audits.  Carrot traceability app for better inventory and less waste.  Manage salad traceability during the salad mixing and packing process.  Leafy greens traceability app full business management packing & processing of kale, microgreens, collard greens, spinach, cabbage, beet, watercress, romaine lettuce, swiss chard, arugula, rukola, endive, bok choy, turnip greens

Inventory traceability

Manage incoming Leafy greens traceability inventory & storage inventory, capture supplier details, traceability and costs (optionally capture on PO in advance), create inventory & pallet labels, record storage location of inventory.  Automatic inventory audit trail and tracking.  Unlimited inventory items. Bar-code inventory management.

Stock-take traceability

Perform stock-takes any time by category or storage location.  Know how much onion inventory you have in real time, even search by storage location.  Report by product line and storage location, or product category. 

OPTION:
LEAFY GREENS FARM Management

Full farm record keeping, activity management, best practices, budgeting, time-sheets, machinery costs, inventory, cherry farm traceability, PHI/WHP management, and more... 

Sales, shipping,  order traceability

Print pick sheet to pick Pepper traceability inventory & storage orders manually, or scan inventory / pallets onto orders, or auto select inventory,  or rapidly sell without an order.  Track paid, and unpaid invoices.  Attach documents to invoices / photos of outgoing shipments.

Traceability & recalls

Instant mock recalls both up and down the supply chain using keys based on supplier lot/batch, supplier name, delivery date, invoice #, inventory #, pallet #, customer reference, order # and more...  Reduces fresh produce food safety compliance costs and makes audits easy.

Invoices, BOL, labels for pallets & inventory traceability

Choose from a gallery of invoices, bill of lading, freight notes, and industry standard fresh produce labels including Walmart, Tesco, Aldi, Coles, Pick 'n Save, Woolworths and more...

Batch packing traceability 

Record all batch inputs such as fruit & vegetables, packaging materials, and other raw materials.  Batch costs automatically tracked.  Batch recalls automatically track suppliers & traceability.

Logistics traceability

View open orders & balances. Assign orders to specific staff for picking, assign to trucks / driver, transport company.  Set loading order for multiple orders on one truck.  See when orders are ready shipped and print bill of lading, export documents, and invoices. 

Quality control

Perform QC tests for incoming pepper inventory, packed, pre-shipping. Configure QC tests for ANYTHING you want to test, supplier quality control tracking.  Attach unlimited photos & documents to QC tests from your cell or tablet.  

Price lists

Manage prices that will be used when a customer order is recorded.  Set up price lists for specials, specific products & customers or promotions.  

Dashboards

Profit:  Analyze profit of each onion line, variety, and even track individual customer profit, and batch level cost & profit.  Sales:  Monitor sales progress & shipments.  Quality:  supplier performance & more...

More...

Auto shipment and sale alerts to customers.  Configure BOM, packing / manufacturing processes, special rules to control the processes in your business (your consultant will do this for you).   

Value adding

For food service and processors:  specify the ingredients for each product you manufacture, farmsoft will calculate required quantities to fill open orders and schedule the batch.  Automatic creation of inventory outputs.  All ingredients and inputs are costed.

Unlimited sites & warehouses

Create multiple sites, specify which sites each employee can view (this restricts inventory, orders, invoices etc to selected sites).  Great for businesses with multiple locations across the country or planet.

Global traceability standards

Farmsoft supports global traceability standards such as GS1 Global Traceability Standard,  

Purchase orders

Order raw materials, packaging materials and more from suppliers.  Analyze orders and prices using Purchases dashboard. 

Re-order alerts

Receive alerts when inventory needs to be reordered, analyze inventory that will need ordering in the future, and inventory that is approaching expiry...


Finance apps

Integrate with Xero finance, or export invoices (AR) and Purchase Orders (AP) to your chosen finance app like MYOB, Quickbooks, , FreshBooks, Wave, SaasAnt, SAGE and others...

Reduce Leafy greens waste by 99%

Inventory control ensures there is no 'shrinkage', fresh produce inventory is FIFO managed, and expiring inventory always monitored, with automatic traceability being enforced at all times.

Reduce Leafy greens traceability administration time by 60%

Automatic traceability & paperwork, labels (case and pallet) and reporting reduces the burden on administration teams and saves everyone's time.

Rapid & consistent Leafy greens quality control

Quality control and food safety has never been easier with industry standard quality tests, food safety checklists; or configure your own tests.  Enhanced post harvest traceability.

100% accurate Leafy greens orders, 100% accurate traceability!

Guarantee only the correct inventory is shipped for each order, on time, every time.  Simple traceability solution.

Easy Leafy greens traceability

Perform instant mock recalls and audits at any time, from anywhere. No need to compile reports or search for documents. International food safety traceability standards maintained.

Reduce Leafy greens traceability overheads by 40%

Automated management of traceability tasks saves operational teams time recording traceability information. 

Faster Leafy greens inventory & traceability

Know exactly which inventory is available, where it is, and when it expires:  any-time, anywhere.  Bar-code tracked inventory is fast and accurate.

100% accurate Leafy greens production & packing

Rapidly assign customer orders to production batches, line & inventory managers receive instant alerts.  Manufacture / pack the exact quantity required for each order. 

Leafy Green Traceability Pilots
IFT’s GFTC and several food industry organizations collaborated with industry stakeholders to support the New Era of Smarter Food Safety. Leafy green traceability pilots reveal the value of sharing extended product information during a traceback investigation.

IFT’s GFTC and several food industry organizations collaborated with industry stakeholders to support the New Era of Smarter Food Safety. Leafy green traceability pilots reveal the value of sharing extended product information during a traceback investigation.

Partner Organizations

FMI-The Food Industry Association
GS1 US
International Foodservice Distributors Association (IFDA)
Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)
Produce Marketing Association (PMA)
United Fresh Produce Association (United Fresh)
Overview

Partners included growers, distributors, and both independent and chain retailers from July through October.
The pilots focused on various romaine-containing products with consideration for different product/supply chain configurations.
The pilots showed that investigations into foodborne illness outbreaks could be streamlined and conducted more effectively when supply chain partners provided extended product information during tracebacks.
The use of a standard template called the Produce Traceback Template to exchange pertinent product information was found to enhance the speed of tracing procedures.
All three pilots were successful in tracing the source of the affected product.
Leafy Greens Task Force Charter (PDF) provides additional details of the project’s goals and objectives
GFTC Leafy Green Traceability Pilots
Leafy Green Traceability Pilots Full Report
The pilot report provides guidance on a path forward for future use of the template including additional industry training and modifications to maximize effectiveness and increase ease of use.

Read the Full Report (PDF)
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FDA’s Overall Goal and Objectives

Work with leafy green stakeholders to design and initiate a pilot that will deliver the key traceability concepts needed for scaling better industry practices such as testing interoperability of tracing systems and public-private data sharing. For more, see the FDA Leafy Greens Action Plan.

Provide industry with better visibility into Coordinted Outbreak Response and Evaluation (CORE) traceability processes
Examine utility of Produce Traceback Template, which was an outcome of the Romaine Task Force
Pilot Process

The pilots tracked romaine lettuce through three separate supply chains, starting with actual consumer purchases made with loyalty cards or credit cards. Small teams of industry experts mimicked FDA’s role in conducting the traceback, including determining the data to be requested, and how to format the requests for such data. Supply chain members, starting with the point-of-sale or point-of-service, used the template to provide key data elements that allowed an item to be traced back to its source. The expert groups conducting the traceback analyzed the information provided by each supply chain node to determine next steps.

Key Findings for Leafy Greens Traceability
Although the participants stated they would adopt the template in the future, the pilots revealed opportunities to refine the template, and highlighted the need for a greater focus on education. The pilot report provides guidance on a path forward for future use of the template including additional industry training and modifications to maximize effectiveness and increase ease of use.

Notably, the data that enabled each of the teams to independently and successfully identify the finished product lot purchased by the consumer is not currently captured by the template. These data included business intelligence, such as sales data, stock rotation, inventory controls and delivery schedules. These were critical in bracketing the scope of the traceback.

A group of six industry organizations today release a report outlining four months of leafy green traceability pilots with supply chain partners, including growers, distributors, and both independent and chain retailers, offering a detailed response to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s call for improved traceability in the food system. The pilots, conducted July through October, showed that investigations into foodborne illness outbreaks could be streamlined and conducted more effectively when supply chain partners provided extended product information during tracebacks. Additionally, the use of a standard template called the Produce Traceback Template to exchange pertinent product information was found to enhance the speed of tracing procedures. All three pilots were successful in tracing the source of the affected product.

The six organizations that led this industry activity included: FMI-The Food Industry Association, GS1 US, the International Foodservice Distributors Association (IFDA), the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), the Produce Marketing Association (PMA) and United Fresh Produce Association (United Fresh). The pilots tracked romaine lettuce through three separate supply chains, starting with actual consumer purchases made with loyalty cards or credit cards. Small teams of industry experts mimicked FDA’s role in conducting the traceback, including determining the data to be requested, and how to format the requests for such data. Supply chain members, starting with the point-of-sale or point-of-service, used the template to provide key data elements that allowed an item to be traced back to its source. The expert groups conducting the traceback analyzed the information provided by each supply chain node to determine next steps.

Although the participants stated they would adopt the template in the future, the pilots revealed opportunities to refine the template, and highlighted the need for a greater focus on education. The pilot report provides guidance on a path forward for future use of the template including additional industry training and modifications to maximize effectiveness and increase ease of use.

Notably, the data that enabled each of the teams to independently and successfully identify the finished product lot purchased by the consumer is not currently captured by the template. These data included business intelligence such as sales data, stock rotation, inventory controls and delivery schedules. These were critical in bracketing the scope of the traceback.

“As outlined in the New Era of Smarter Food Safety Blueprint, pilots like these are necessary to determine what is needed for traceability to further scale, such as testing interoperability and public and private data sharing,” said Bryan Hitchcock, executive director of IFT’s Global Food Traceability Center, on behalf of the six organizations. “The pilots provided valuable insights that will inform future outbreak response and recall protocols, helping industry to work together to support the FDA’s focus on tech-enabled traceability.”

For more information on the pilot, please visit ift.org/leafygreens.

About FMI-The Food Industry Association - As the food industry association, FMI works with and on behalf of the entire industry to advance a safer, healthier and more efficient consumer food supply chain. FMI brings together a wide range of members across the value chain — from retailers that sell to consumers, to producers that supply food and other products, as well as the wide variety of companies providing critical services — to amplify the collective work of the industry. www.FMI.org

About GS1 US - GS1 US, a member of GS1, is an information standards organization that brings industry communities together to solve supply-chain problems through the adoption and implementation of GS1 standards. More than 300,000 businesses in 25 industries rely on GS1 US for trading-partner collaboration and for maximizing the cost effectiveness, speed, visibility, security and sustainability of their business processes. They achieve these benefits through solutions based on GS1 global unique numbering and identification systems, bar codes, Electronic Product Code (EPC®)-based Radio Frequency Identification (RFID, data synchronization, and electronic information exchange. GS1 US also manages the United Nations Standard Products and Services Code (UNSPSC®). www.GS1US.org

About IFDA - The International Foodservice Distributors Association (IFDA) is the premier trade organization representing the $303 billion foodservice distribution industry and the 350,000 people it employs. This industry ensures a safe and efficient supply of food and products to more than one million restaurants and foodservice outlets in the U.S. every day. For more information, visit www.ifdaonline.org.

About IFT - The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) is a global organization of approximately 13,000 individual members from 95 countries committed to advancing the science of food. Since 1939, IFT has brought together the brightest minds in food science, technology and related professions from academia, government, and industry to solve the world’s greatest food challenges. Our organization works to ensure that our members have the resources they need to learn, grow, and advance the science of food as the population and the world evolve. We believe that science is essential to ensuring a global food supply that is sustainable, safe, nutritious, and accessible to all. For more information, please visit www.ift.org.

About Produce Marketing Association (PMA) - Produce Marketing Association is the leading trade association representing companies from every segment of the global produce and floral supply chain. PMA helps members grow by providing business solutions that expand business opportunities and increase sales and consumption. For more information, visit www.pma.com.

About United Fresh Produce Association (United Fresh) - Founded in 1904, the United Fresh Produce Association serves companies at the forefront of the global fresh and fresh-cut produce industry, including growers, shippers, fresh-cut processors, wholesalers, distributors, retailers, foodservice operators, industry suppliers and allied associations. From its headquarters in Washington, D.C. and Western Regional office in Salinas, Calif., United Fresh and its members work year-round to make a difference for the produce industry by driving policies that increase consumption of fresh produce, shaping critical legislative and regulatory action, providing scientific and technical leadership in food safety, quality assurance, nutrition and health, and developing educational programs and business opportunities to assist member companies in growing successful businesses. 

LEAFY GREENS TRACEABILTY SYSTEMS
From July through the end of October, 2020, GS1 US worked with five other industry organizations and key industry stakeholders to simulate multiple recalls involving three different types of romaine lettuce products.

In response to the U.S. Food and Drug Administrations (FDA’s) initiatives for improved traceability in the produce supply chain, the Food Marketing Institute, GS1 US, the International Foodservice Distributors Association, the Institute of Food Technologists, Produce Marketing Association, and United Fresh focused these pilots on tracing leafy green products through actual consumer purchases made with loyalty cards or credit cards. Pilot results demonstrated an investigation can be conducted more effectively when supply chain partners gather pertinent information from each other that may not always be asked by investigators during tracebacks. The pilots also revealed that an enhanced standard template could improve the speed of tracing procedures.

These pilots just scratch the surface of what can be done to enhance food traceability processes in the leafy greens sector. A category that has too often been the subject of widespread foodborne illness outbreaks over the past several years, it represents an opportunity for the industry to collaborate and more fully leverage the digital tools available to them to pinpoint the source of harmful pathogens or other recall triggers.

Let’s examine more of the key findings of the 2020 Leafy Greens Traceability Pilots, which are sure to be key indicators of how traceability will evolve to meet consumer expectations for transparency, sustainability, and safety.

Existing Product Movement Information Led to Lot Identification
One of the most important findings placed great emphasis on existing product movement information. Extended data, gathered from a supplier (grower or processor) to a distribution center (retailer distribution center or third-party), into the store, and out through point-of-sale, was key to helping the industry experts successfully identify the lots from where the romaine originated.

Take a look at each pilot scenario below to see how each pilot varied in its structure but similarly leveraged the power of extended product data to enhance the traceability of the romaine:

• Pilot 1: This pilot involved branded bagged salad from a regional chain grocery store. By understanding product movement in this supply chain, and by requesting additional information from the retailer and processor, the pilot team identified the single product lot, which traced back to two growers and a total of three ranch-field-sublot combinations (Figure 1).

• Pilot 2: This pilot involved romaine hearts sold at an independent retailer that used a third-party distributor. By understanding product movement in this supply chain, pilot team 2 was successful in identifying the two lot numbers of the finished product that could have been purchased by the consumer.

• Pilot 3: This pilot involved private label salad (under U.S. Department of Agriculture jurisdiction) from a national chain store. Due to the fact the product had been out of stock prior to the consumer purchase, this “clean break” allowed pilot team 3 to identify two possible finished product lot numbers on the purchase date.

Raising Awareness of Information Available at Each Step
Each of the three expert teams that conducted the tracebacks reported a better understanding of the traceback process and were occasionally surprised by which points in the supply chain retained different pieces of information. In all pilots, the teams augmented their requests for industry information and data beyond the scope of the key data elements identified in the traceback template. It was these other data requests that proved critical in identifying the finished product lot number associated with the purchase of interest. Here are some examples of the types of information and the value they provided:

Shopper and credit card data: These data were valuable because they included purchase dates, which created “hard stops.” In other words, product that was not yet available for purchase was easily determined to be outside the scope of the data request. There is an opportunity to standardize the way purchase information is requested by regulators so that sufficient context is provided.

Inventory, sales and other business intelligence: Based on the purchase date, each team then determined the date range for which to request records. Although two teams started with broad requests (based on assumed or reported product shelf life) and one team began more narrowly, ultimately each team based their final identification of the purchased lot code based on their understanding of product flow through the supply chain. While the industry participants captured slightly different information, each retailer still had a detailed accounting of product sales at the store level. This paired with information on replenishment (based on shipments from a distribution center, receipts at a store, and/or restocking procedures) enabled each team to accurately determine the finished product lot codes available for purchase. Buyer requirements such as the number of days of shelf life that must remain also helped narrow the scope of the request and were used in the interpretation of product movement.

Traceback Template Improvements
The main benefit of using the standard template was that it was a helpful tool in summarizing data that each supply chain participant may have had in disparate places (e.g., different software systems, different pieces of paperwork, etc.). However, the detailed information (including both master data as well as transactional data) overwhelmed many of the industry participants, and the expert teams reported that only narrow subsets of the data were used to link product as it moved through the supply chain.

Regardless of the edits and adjustments to the template, it became clear that education and training will be needed to encourage adoption and consistency in use. In some cases, participants suggested more automation of the template to provide this consistency and aid in establishing linkages to each data set. This includes drop-down menus and rules to standardize the way information is conveyed (e.g., standardizing state abbreviations, limiting the number of digits in product identification fields).

Ultimately, these pilots are by no means representative of the multitude of supply chains configurations and nuances associated with traceability. However, this exercise was important to show that, despite criticisms of the ability to trace leafy greens through the supply chain, each pilot team was able to narrow down the lot code of the hypothetical “contaminated product” purchased by the consumer, which allowed for the identification of inputs into the finished product. In this regard, the association partners view the pilot as a call to collaborate and encourage interested stakeholders to collaborate on similar tests or mock recalls to gain additional learnings.


BETTER TRACEABILITY FOR LEAFY GREENS
In response to FDA's September call for improved leafy greens traceability, a group of six food industry organizations in December released a report outlining four months of leafy green traceability pilots with supply chain partners, including growers, distributors and both independent and chain retailers.

Three pilot tests to track a theoretically recalled lot of produce were conducted July through October, and all were successful in tracing the source of the affected product.

The pilots showed that investigations into foodborne illness outbreaks could be streamlined and conducted more effectively when supply chain partners provided extended product information during tracebacks. Additionally, the use of a standard template called the Produce Traceback Template to exchange pertinent product information was found to enhance the speed of tracing procedures.

The six organizations were FMI-The Food Industry Assn.; GS1 US; International Foodservice Distributors Assn. (IFDA); Institute of Food Technologists (IFT); Produce Marketing Assn. (PMA) and United Fresh Produce Assn. (United Fresh).

Earlier, the Produce Traceability Initiative – a working group created by Canadian Produce Marketing Association, GS1 US, Produce Marketing Assn. and United Fresh Produce Assn. – identified "Seven Milestones to PTI Implementation" for case-level electronic traceability in the produce industry: obtain company prefix, assign GTIN numbers, provide GTIN numbers to buyers, show human readable information on cases, encode information in a barcode, read and store information on inbound cases, read and store information on outbound cases.

The Produce Traceback Template was created by a Produce Traceability Initiative working group. Supply chain members, starting with the point-of-sale or point-of-service, used the template to provide key data elements that allowed an item to be traced back to its source. The expert groups conducting the traceback analyzed the information provided by each supply chain node to determine next steps.

The pilot tests tracked romaine lettuce through three separate supply chains, starting with actual consumer purchases made with loyalty cards or credit cards. Small teams of industry experts mimicked FDA’s role in conducting the traceback, including determining the data to be requested, and how to format the requests for such data.

Although the participants said they would adopt the template in the future, the pilots revealed opportunities to refine the template and highlighted the need for a greater focus on education. Notably, the data that enabled each of the teams to successfully identify the product lot purchased by the consumer is not currently captured by the template. These data included business intelligence such as sales data, stock rotation, inventory controls and delivery schedules. These were critical in bracketing the scope of the traceback.

The pilot report provides guidance on a path forward for future use of the template including additional industry training and modifications to maximize effectiveness and increase ease of use.

“As outlined in the New Era of Smarter Food Safety Blueprint, pilots like these are necessary to determine what is needed for traceability to further scale, such as testing interoperability and public and private data sharing,” said Bryan Hitchcock, executive director of IFT’s Global Food Traceability Center and speaking on behalf of the six organizations. “The pilots provided valuable insights that will inform future outbreak response and recall protocols, helping industry to work together to support the FDA’s focus on tech-enabled traceability.”